University of Houston-Victoria

COVID-19

What to Do if I’m Sick

If you have a fever, cough or any of the other coronavirus symptoms, you might have COVID-19. Do not come to class or work. Do not participate in any campus activities or come to campus. (This does not apply if the presence of symptoms is due to a pre-existing medical condition or a medical diagnosis unrelated to COVID-19.)

Students:

  • Contact your personal physician or the Community Health Centers of South Central Texas if you are a UHV student in Victoria for diagnosis, treatment and/or testing, as necessary.
  • Notify your RA if you are living in residential housing or the COVID-19 response coordinator at covidops@uhv.edu if you are living off campus.
  • Stay home and continue to monitor your symptoms.
  • Follow CDC guidance (below).
  • Complete the Diagnosis or Symptoms Reporting form.
  • If at any time you test positive for COVID-19, resubmit the Diagnosis or Symptoms Reporting form and notify the COVID-19 response coordinator at covidops@uhv.edu.
  • Follow the Self-Quarantine/Isolation protocols, and do not return to campus until written approval is received. See Completion of Self-Quarantine/Isolation.

Employees:

  • Contact your health care provider for diagnosis, treatment and/or testing, as necessary. (If you are a BCBSTX HealthSelect participant, telehealth virtual visits are available to you at no cost.)
  • Contact your supervisor as soon as possible.
  • Stay home and continue to monitor your symptoms.
  • Follow CDC guidance (below).
  • Complete the Diagnosis or Symptoms Reporting form.
  • If at any time you test positive for COVID-19, resubmit the Diagnosis or Symptoms Reporting form and notify your supervisor (who will inform the COVID-19 response coordinator).
  • Follow the Self-Quarantine/Isolation protocols, and do not return to campus until written approval is received. See Completion of Self-Quarantine/Isolation. Depending upon the circumstances, an employee may continue to work remotely if approved to do so.

Read guidance from the CDC.


Stay home except to get medical care

  • Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. Do not leave your home except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.
  • Take care of yourself. Get rest and stay hydrated. Take over-the-counter medicines, such as acetaminophen, to help you feel better.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you have trouble breathing, have any other emergency warning signs, or you think it is an emergency.
  • Avoid public transportation, ride-sharing or taxis.

Separate yourself from other people

  • As much as possible, stay in a specific room away from other people and pets in your home. If possible, you should use a separate bathroom. If you need to be around other people or animals in or outside of the home, wear a cloth face covering.

Monitor your symptoms

  • Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough and shortness of breath, but other symptoms also may be present. Trouble breathing is a more serious symptom that means you should get medical attention. Follow care instructions from your health care provider.

When to Seek Emergency Medical Attention

  • Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:
    • Trouble breathing
    • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
    • New confusion
    • Inability to wake or stay awake
    • Bluish lips or face
  • Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Call ahead before visiting your doctor

  • Many medical visits for routine care are being postponed or done by phone or telemedicine.
  • If you have a medical appointment that cannot be postponed, call your doctor’s office and tell the staff you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the office staff members protect themselves and other patients.

Wear a cloth covering over your nose and mouth

  • You should wear a cloth face covering over your nose and mouth if you must be around other people or animals, including pets (even at home).
  • You don’t need to wear the cloth face covering if you are alone. If you can’t put on a cloth face covering (because of trouble breathing, for example), cover your coughs and sneezes in some other way. Try to stay at least 6 feet away from other people. This will help protect the people around you.

Cover your coughs and sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Throw away used tissues in a lined trash can.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol.

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. This is especially important after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
  • Use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry.
  • Soap and water are the best option, especially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Read these handwashing tips.

Avoid sharing personal household items

  • Do not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels or bedding with other people in your home.
  • Wash these items thoroughly after using them with soap and water or put in the dishwasher.

Clean all “high-touch” surfaces daily

  • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in your “sick room” and bathroom; wear disposable gloves. Let someone else clean and disinfect surfaces in common areas, but you should clean your bedroom and bathroom, if possible.
  • High-touch surfaces include phones, remote controls, counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, keyboards, tablets and bedside tables.
  • See CDC Information on complete disinfection guidance.

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.